The Real Life Experience of Sensory Processing Disorder

By Alyssa Neudorf

The first question most people ask is, what is sensory processing disorder (SPD)? I would describe it simply as processing the entire world differently. A person who is partially sighted or hearing impaired will process the information coming to those senses in a different way from someone with typical vision or hearing.

What does this mean for me? As a person with SPD, it means that I process all the information coming to ALL of my senses differently, more intensely and all at the same time. Most people have the luxury of blocking out repetitive stimuli like the clock ticking, the clothes you are wearing, the smells in the air and, the chair you are sitting on while reading – this is not something I get to do. I am aware of everything all the time.

When all this intense and repetitive information becomes too much something called sensory overload is reached. Sensory overload can look and feel different for each individual person. For me, it is something that happens suddenly. I am fine until I am not. I begin to feel very warm, shaky, things start to dim around the outside of my eyes. My brain starts to try and leave my body making it very, very hard to speak or move without help. It feels like there is a tonne of bricks stacked on my vocal cords and the signals to legs are slow or blocked. Mentally I know I can speak and I can move but making that happen is very hard. It is at this point that a simple question, touch or surprise will trigger a meltdown. People will often ask “what do you need?”, or “what can I do?” The problem is at this point I don’t know and if I do I can’t always tell you. I can’t think and I feel frozen and stuck with everything spinning, flashing and pounding away around me all while becoming more intense. Then hyperventilation kicks in.

Sound exhausting and painful yet?

Having a schedule and routine helps me to plan out my sensory energy for the day. There is only such much I can do with 20 tokens and everything in your days takes different amounts. Getting dressed, eating, school, being social, going outside, tying your shoes, and taking the bus just to name a few. As a result, I can’t drive yet even though I would like to, don’t go shopping much, I wear certain clothing, most of my shoes don’t have laces (those that still do will be replaced with elastics), and I only wear specific socks. Clothes shopping is a big challenge and thus is avoided and is only done on a day when I don’t have to do anything else that day.

That is just a small window into the life of one person with SPD. It is different from person to person. Hopefully this article has helped you gain some understanding of what it is like to have SPD.

The Importance of Indoor Play

By: Simran Saroya

Sometimes we feel that it is easy to hand our children the iPad or phone to keep them occupied. Even on a snow day or a rainy day there are ways to make these situations positive interactions. Giving them a phone or tablet is easy but not the most interesting choice for your child. Indoor play can consist of more stimulating, fun and active play that will help your child’s brain develop.

When we think about indoor play, we talk about roleplaying, games and engagement opportunities. If you are baking cookies, having the child present and engaged is a form of play for them where they can use their senses and create something new. When thinking about play we should consider all five senses: look, listen, touch, smell and taste. Where can my child use these five senses with me?

Through play children are able to create healthy brain architecture which allows them to have better peer social interactions, use their imagination and creativity and engage with the world around them. Play is so important for children; it is the foundation to all the learning that is going to happen here on forward.  Play can also strengthen physical, emotional and cognitive strength within the child.

Now indoor play, how do you play inside on a rainy day or a day where the outdoors is not easily accessible? Here is a list of things you can do indoors with your child!

  1. Board games
  2. Scavenger hunt
  3. Make slime!
  4. Cook with your child (cookies, jello, rice krispies, or even prep for dinner)
  5. Read stories
  6. Visit an indoor play place (Telus Spark, Glenbow, swimming, Calgary public library)

Let your child take the lead and have them decide what they would like to do indoors with you or with a friend. This way the child feels a sense of independence in choosing an activity or game. Children create and preserve friendships through play therefore indoor and outdoor play are both essential in a child’s growth and development.

Understanding the benefits in your child’s play can be a bit confusing. Play fosters cognitive growth meaning that is essential for healthy brain development. Sometimes we believe that play must have a goal behind it, a structure to it. In reality, free play positively affects neurological connections by making those circuits in the brain stronger. Free play will allow your child to build communication skills, self-confidence and intelligence. Through play children become less anxious and more resilient to deal with real life situations. Once the adults in the child’s life understand how important it is to play, the child will benefit and the adults will benefit. Promoting play as quality time spent indoors will strengthen your relationship with your child and allow for meaning making and a world of connections to be brought to the table. It is amazing what their little minds can come up with!

Hooray for reading with your child!

By: Stephanie Magnussen

Most parents know that it is important to read to their children.  Many parents do this naturally before bed even when their children are very young.  Children crave language and pick up on so much of what parents say in conversation during the day, but book reading is another opportunity to add words and phrases that may not naturally occur in everyday speech.  This exposure to language adds variety to the input kids are getting on a daily basis and can increase their language abilities.

The more you read to your child, the more language she will potentially acquire early on.  When parents read to their child, they use more diverse vocabulary and rephrase sentences in different ways, exposing children to varied sentence structure.  We have all noticed that as we get older, it gets harder and harder to master a new language.  Children learn an entirely new language within their first few years of life without even realizing they are mastering such a complicated skill.  During these impressionable years, it is important to expose children to not only lots of vocabulary, but different ways of saying things.  Books give parents the opportunity to get out of their daily way of speaking and add some different flavor to the language they are exposing to their children.  It also gives kids the chance to directly engage with the words and phrases on the page.

There are easy principles that can be applied to the way a parent reads to this child that can promote language development.  This method of dialogic reading can be used for typically developing children as well to increase language skills!  Parents can and should start reading to their children as early as eight months to aid in their language development.

  1. Guess the plot of the book after reading the title. The first time you and your child read a book, read the cover page to your child.  Encourage her to guess what the book could be about and take your time talking about this.

 

  1. Point to the words on the page as you read. Once you have read a book to your child one time through, point to the words as you are reading them.  You can name some of the letters and identify which one is the same as the first letter in her name.

 

  1. Expand on your child’s sentence. If a child says “blue,” the parent can respond and say “Yes, the kite is blue and so is the sky!”

 

  1. Model, model model! If a child cannot answer the question, simply say “That is a kite.  Can you say kite?”  This will instill a sense of accomplishment when they can repeat or attempt the word even if they were not able to find it the first time.  Then, later on, when they have learned the word, give them praise!

 

  1. Pause reading and respond to what a child is interested in on the page. Sometimes a child will point to or name something while a parent is reading.  Pause and expand on this by giving context to what she has named.  For example, “Yes, that is a kite and we can fly kites on windy days.”  This is also a good opportunity to talk about the story.  You can ask, “Remember when he flew the kite?” or “Have you ever flown a kite?”

 

  1. Prompt your child to read with you. Leave out the last word in a sentence and encourage your child to fill it in.

 

  1. Have fun! Reading can be free flowing with pauses to talk about interesting things on the page.  Parents can engage a child by asking her to help turn the page, encourage turn taking by pointing to objects and naming them, etc.  There should not be any pressure associated with reading and children should feel encouraged.  Make reading into a game or activity that you can share with your child!

 

Connecting with a Multidisciplinary Approach

By: Stephanie Magnussen

Although it may seem apparent that a child needs specific help, there usually are many layers to an individual’s needs.  For example, if a child has a speech delay, the parent may request that he sees a speech pathologist.  But why does this child have a speech delay?  Is there is a sensory need that is not being met, or are there developmental delays or behavioral issues at work?  Kids are complicated little people, and it’s important to remember that what we see is only the tip of the iceberg.  It’s really beneficial for a group of therapists to explore what lies beneath the surface to give the child the most effective strategies to thrive academically, socially, and mentally.

Perhaps the short term goals for a child with Autism Spectrum Disorder are maintaining eye contact and increased vocabulary, and the long term goals are independence and integration into a typical classroom.  The speech pathologist will develop activities that increase vocabulary, while the occupational therapist creates drills for promoting eye contact, and the psychologist may make social stories that build confidence and promote more appropriate social behavior.  Just having one therapist would not be the most advantageous for the child and family in this case.  The parents are also part of the multidisciplinary team.  They must be on board with practicing what the therapists are working on and provide a supportive environment for the child to thrive under this team approach.

At Connecting Dots, all of the therapists are registered health care professionals with Master’s level education.  They all work together and share ideas on how to set a child up for success by using each of their expertise.  If a child is exhibiting disfluent speech or a stutter, and therefore struggling socially at school, of course we want to promote smooth speech, but there may be other issues to address.  The child may have motor planning deficits which result in disfluent speech.  The speech pathologist can work on an action plan for smooth speech, while the occupational therapist develops a plan to promote increased ability for the muscles to make the correct movements for speech.  Psychologists are also a key part of this multidisciplinary approach.  Communication is not just the words that we speak, but also our ability to interact with those around us.  Any disability can be stressful for a child, and may result in anxiety and social isolation.  A psychologist can identify activities and games that will help a child excel socially.

As an aide at Connecting Dots, I have been fortunate to work with speech pathologists, occupational therapists, and psychologists and have seen the gains my clients are making by working on each piece of their puzzle.   Every child’s background and needs are so diverse, and an individualized plan with input from different types of therapists allows the team to work on gains for the child in a holistic manner.  It is truly a team approach between the therapists, aides, and family members.